TURNING JAPANESE? I REALLY THINK SO:

Bush Likens Iraqi Action to Transition in ’40’s Japan (DAVID E. SANGER, 12/10/05, NY Times)

President Bush suggested Friday that history will vindicate his decision to invade Iraq, saying he believed that a half century from now, it will be regarded as important a transition for the world as the democratization of Japan was after World War II.

“I’m absolutely convinced that some day, 50 or 60 years from now, an American president will be speaking to an audience saying, ‘Thank goodness a generation of Americans rose to the challenge and helped people be liberated from tyranny,’ ” Mr. Bush said. ” ‘Democracy spread and the world is more peaceful for it.'”

It’ll obviously be more important, having reformed Islam and liberalized the entire Middle East instead of changing just one insular island nation.

MORE:
President’s Remarks at Mark Kennedy ’06 and Minnesota Republican Party Victory Reception (President George W. Bush, Hilton Minneapolis Hotel, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 12/09/05)

You know, I recently went to the Far East, as you may know, and visited with my friend, Prime Minister Koizumi of Japan. He’s a good fellow, and he’s a good friend. It struck me then, like it has in previous times, about how ironic it is in a way that the son of an 18-year-old Navy fighter pilot who fought the Japanese is now talking peace with the leader of a country that was our sworn enemy. Think about that for a minute. Sixty years ago, a lot of folks, a lot of your relatives, signed up to fight an enemy that attacked us. By the way, we lost more people on September the 11th than we did when Pearl Harbor was bombed. And a lot of people went and fought, and there was a lot of death and destruction. And yet, 60 years later — which seems like a long time when you’re 59 — (laughter) — but it’s really not all that long in the march of history — I’m talking with Prime Minister Koizumi about how to keep the peace. So something happened between the time that my dad and your relatives signed up in World War II, and I’m talking peace with Koizumi. And what happened was Japan became a democracy.

These are historic times. We have an obligation and a duty to protect the American people. And we’ll do just that. That’s why Mark Kennedy needs to be in the United States Senate. And we have an opportunity — (applause) — and we have an historic opportunity to lay the foundation of peace for generations to come. I’m absolutely convinced that some day, 50 or 60 years from now, an American President will be speaking to an audience saying, thank goodness a generation of Americans rose to the challenge and helped people be liberated from tyranny; democracy spread, and the world is more peaceful for it. (Applause.)

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: